Eating healthfully. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and the Mediterranean diet, like many healthy-eating plans, limit unhealthy fats and emphasize fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains. Both dietary approaches have been found to offer important health benefits — in addition to weight loss — for people who have components of metabolic syndrome.
Blood pressure rises with aging and the risk of becoming hypertensive in later life is considerable.[37] Several environmental factors influence blood pressure. High salt intake raises the blood pressure in salt sensitive individuals; lack of exercise, obesity, and depression[38] can play a role in individual cases. The possible roles of other factors such as caffeine consumption,[39] and vitamin D deficiency[40] are less clear. Insulin resistance, which is common in obesity and is a component of syndrome X (or the metabolic syndrome), is also thought to contribute to hypertension.[41] One review suggests that sugar may play an important role in hypertension and salt is just an innocent bystander.[42]
The prevailing opinion is that all of these markers are signs of insulin resistance, meaning the diminished ability of a given amount of insulin to exert its normal effect. When insulin resistance develops, it can impact metabolic processes in many ways, resulting in the specific markers listed above. However, different individuals respond to insulin resistance in different ways. Also, the time frame in which certain signs develop varies. This variability makes defining—and treating—metabolic syndrome tricky.
Place a Swiss ball in front of you on the floor. Place forearms and fists on the top of it and keep your body in a straight line from your ankles to head. Keep core engaged, elbows bent at 90 degrees, and naturally arch lower back as you roll the ball forward. Make sure your body doesn't collapse as you perform this movement. Pause here, then using your abs, pull the ball back toward knees to starting position.
[Guideline] Skyler JS, Bergenstal R, Bonow RO, et al. Intensive glycemic control and the prevention of cardiovascular events: implications of the ACCORD, ADVANCE, and VA Diabetes Trials: a position statement of the American Diabetes Association and a Scientific Statement of the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Jan 20. 53(3):298-304. [Medline].
Dietary changes: The health care provider might recommend a diet that includes more vegetables (especially leafy green vegetables), fruits, low-fat dairy products, and fiber-rich foods, and fewer carbohydrates, fats, processed foods, and sugary drinks. He or she also might recommend preparing low-sodium dishes and not adding salt to foods. Watch out for foods with lots of hidden salt (like bread, sandwiches, pizza, and many restaurant and fast-food options).
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